Monthly Archives: October 2008

February Baby Jacket

Last Year I got a copy of Elisabeth Zimmerman’s Knitters’ Almanac and have been waiting until now to knit this up.  I had some lovely soft cotton from my aunt that was great for it – super soft.  Now I need to block, weave and darn ends in and we’ll be set.  It will have to sit and wait for the baby for a few months yet thought!
I hadn’t used the M1 method that she suggested in the book before (basically just twisting a loop around the needle) so i thought I’d give it a go. Not too happy with the effect it creates, it seems like too noticeable an increase. On the wrong side of the fabric it looks like a series of loops.  I don’t think I’ll be using it again.
Other that that I love the cardigan pattern- so simple and effective. If I were to do it again I think that I’d use a different increase method and perhaps decrease the sleeves a little (not sure about this in terms of the lace).

Lime with a Twist

Lime with a Twist

Lime with a Twist

Difficulty: Intermediate

SIZE
XS [S, M, L, 1X, 2X, 3X] (shown in size S)
Bust size: 30[34, 38, 42, 46, 50, 54] inches

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS
Chest: 32[36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56] inches
Length: 20[20, 20.5, 21, 21.5, 22, 22.5] inches

There is more about the pattern on my Pattern For Sale page.

Lime with a Twist - Back

Lime with a Twist - Back

I had so much fun knitting this cardigan during the summer.  With tech editing, test knitting and of course writing the pattern it has taken me until now to publish it!  Butterflysparkle on ravelry has made a version in Garnstudio Paris which I think looks wonderful. Now that is is published I can finally get to wear it without worrying about the need to photograph it again.

On a similar note, I have knitting a scarf in Noro Silk garden Chunky using the same stitch pattern.If you want a wool version of Lime with a Twist this yarn knits at the correct gauge and produces a lovely fabric.  Here is a small section of the scarf:

Noro Silk Garden Chunky scarf

Noro Silk Garden Chunky scarf

Tutorials

In a few weeks time I should have my ‘Lime with a Twist’ cardigan up for sale. This cardigan is fairly straightforward to knit but it does involve both a provisional cast on and quite a few picked up stitches.

Hopefully (if I can get someone to take photos!) I will put a tutorial on my favorite way to do both of these.
There are many different ways to create a provisional (or invisible) cast on. The method I find the easiest and use the most is the crochet cast on directly onto the needle. Bear in mind that you don’t need to know how to crochet to do this (I am not able to crochet) and it is easy to control.

Picking up stitches is very useful to feel comfortable if you want to avoid sewing knitted pieces together. To make your picked up stitches look as tidy and professional as possible you need to always ensure that you pick your stitches up in the same row – it sounds simple but it can be remarkably easy to slide across a row and it really ruins the edge.
Also with picked up stitches you want to avoid holes, two things to keep in mind are to avoid picking up where there is a big gap – if you work into more tightly knit stitches there is no give to create a hole when the piece is being worn.
Usually when you pick up stitches you are asked to ‘pick up and knit’ the stitch, when you do this you should keep the yarn as tight as you can. If you find the stitches loose you can cheat a little by knitting into the back of the next row to tighten them up a little.
The only time I have really seem only ‘pick up’ called for is with applied I-cord’. In this case just picking up the loop that the stitch will be worked through is all you do.
More (with photos) of these tutorials in the near future.

October already

I can’t believe that we are already 5 days into October. The last few days have been getting really cold in the evening and I’m feeling the strong need for some more warm weather clothing. My Cabled Hoodie is still moving along slowly in the background but even though I really love the pattern I find myself working much more slowly on other pieces patterns. I think when you are writing the pattern yourself you knit at super speed as you are waiting to discover what it it going to look like. You have the idea in your head – you may even have made up a swatch and written some of the pattern but until you get the yarn and needles out you just really don’t know what it is going to look like.
I think that when you start flying though the knitting you can think more creatively along the way – all sorts of different ways of solving the design problems start appearing. Can you tell I love designing!!