Terra Garter Raglan

Last week the new Knit.Purl magazine came out and I’ve got a sweater, Terra Garter Raglan, in it. This is the kind of sweater I like to live in, it’s got a few nice details, the yarn is super soft and the shape is flattering. It’s knit from the top down with raglan shoulder shaping. There are wide garter stitch panels at each raglan that continue right down the body.

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Photos are copyright Harper Point Photography.
Dramatic garter-stitch panels flow from the neck, down raglan shaping, and into the body. This easy knit is worked from the top down. Smooth waist contours are emphasized by working them inside the garter-stitch panels.

Finished Size 35 (37¾, 41¼, 44, 46¾, 50¼)” bust circumference. Pullover shown measures 35″, modeled with 2″ of positive ease.

Yarn The Fibre Company Terra (40% baby alpaca, 40% wool, 20% silk; 98 yd 90 m/1¾ oz 50 g): #0391 iron, 10 (11, 12, 12, 13, 14) skeins. Yarn distributed by Kelbourne Woolens.

Needles Size 8 (5 mm): 16″ and 32″ circular (cir) and set of double-pointed (dpn). Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.

Notions Markers (m); stitch holders; tapestry needle.

Gauge 18 sts and 26 rnds = 4″ in St st.

Ribbon Tool Edging

Last Spring I had a shawl, Ribbon Tool Shawl, published in the spring issue of Interweave Knits. It’s not a very complex knit but starting the edging has got some knitters into problems so I thought I’d put a quick photo tutorial together to help them out.

First you finish the body of the shawl and break the yarn – in the swatch I’m working on that’s the little strip of garter stitch sitting on the table! Now for the edging with a double pointed needle you cast on the correct number of stitches and work the wrong-side set-up row. This is what’s pictured here.
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Now in the pattern you work row 1 of the edging. This is what catches knitters out. You begin by working a Chain 6. The chain 6 is knitting the same stitch 6 times to form a ‘chain’ of knitted stitches similar to a crocheted chain.
Begin by knitting the first stitch and slipping it back to the left needle.
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Now you knit this stitch 5 more times (slipping it back after each time you knit it).
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When you are finished you will have a chain of stitches that looks like this, with the final stitch on your right needle.

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Now you knit the next stitch so you will have 2 stitches on your right needle.
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Now you lift the second stitch over the first, this will effective ‘close’ the chain loop that will be at the edge of your shawl.
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Once this chain loop is complete work the remainder of Row 1 of the edging as written until you reach the final stitch. This is where you will join the body of the shawl with the edging. You want to knit this last edging stitch with the first stitch of the body.
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As they are still on 2 needles you can either knit them together with the 2 needles or transfer the stitch from the dpn to the shawl body needle.
From this point you can also use just the circular needles for the remainder of the shawl if it is easier for you.
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September price changes

I wanted to let you all know about some upcoming price changes. Up to this point all of my patterns have been priced at €5, however there is a big variation in the complexity and length of different pattern types. For this reason from September I will have a tiered pricing system; accessories will remain at €5, children’s patterns will be €5.50, and garments will be priced at €6.

These prices changes are necessary for a number of reasons; among them taxes and variations in currency exchange.

These price changes will come into effect in September.

Viminal

So we come to the final project from Dovestone Hills; Viminal. This sweater uses one of my all time favourite construction techniques; top down with short row set-in sleeves. In this sweater I wanted to blend two very different but complementary colours as seamlessly as possible to create an ombre effect.

The sweater begins at the shoulders with 2 stripes (one for each shoulder) worked from the neck out to the shoulder. These stitches can be left on a holder to form the top of the sleeve later. The stitches for the back and front are picked up from these strips and the shoulder slope is then worked using short rows at each side. The rest of the armholes are worked on each side increasing as necessary. Finally the body is joined under the armholes and worked in the round to the hem. There are a few little finishing details as well; the hem and cuffs are finished with folded hems but they pick up the second colour giving you a little glimpse at the bottom edge. The neck edge is gently rounded (easy to drop down if you want to) and finished with an I-cord edging.

Once the body is finished we go back to work the sleeves. There are live stitches at the top of the sleeve and we pick up stitches along the edge on either side. Short rows are worked back and forth to form the sleeve cap and then the sleeve is worked in the round to the cuff.

What colour combinations do you think you’d do for your version of Viminal?

Palatino


Palatino, the next pattern from Dovestone Hills was a wonderful surprise to me. It was designed as a hat to match the Esquilino cowl. It is knit from side-to-side with the same ribbed cable pattern as the cowl. However as this is a hat I used short rows at the crown to shape it. As with the cowl you begin with a provisional cast-on. The the hat is knit in a series of wedges that use German Short rows to shape the top (these are very easy to work in both knit and purl) until the correct length and it is grafted together at the end.

The surprise came for me at the end; I had finished the wedges and the grafting was done. I was drawing a needle through the edge stitches in the center of the crown when I saw it; the short rows in the cables created a wonderful star flower at the centre of the crown. It’s my favourite part of the hat and it was a complete surprise :-)

If you need help with German short rows or just want to learn more about Short Rows both my craftsy short row class or my upcoming Short Row book would both be useful to you.

 

Quirinalis

We’re already on the second last garment from Dovestone Hills; Quirinalis. This uses one of my favourite construction techniques, seamless set-in sleeves. The cardigan is knit from the bottom up in one piece to the armhole. From there the front and back are worked separately and armhole decreases are worked. Finally the shoulders are joined together using a 3-needle bind-off. When the body is finished the stitches for the sleeve are picked up around the armhole and the set-in sleeve cap in worked using short rows. The remainder of the sleeve is worked from the top down.

First let’s take a look at the the cables; these are not your standard cables! I wanted this cardigan to have a modern, more geometric feel so the cables I’ve used are zigzag and undulating along the front of the cardigan. I love working cables but when a garment is heavily cabled it can make it a bit dense for everyday wear. These add ‘just enough’ so this can become your favourite everyday cardigan.

You can see here as well that I’ve kept the rest simple; both the back and sleeves are worked in Dot Stitch giving it a nicely textured feel which works really well with a nice woolly yarn.

The folded collar is one of my favourite details; it’s worked to double length and folded inwards, then when you’re doing your bind-off you pick up the cast-on stitches and knit them together. this creates a seamless ‘seam’ that has all the stretch of a knitted finish.

Esquilino

The time has come to take a look at the next accessory from Dovestone Hills; Esquilino. This is a cowl that is knit from side-to-side and uses a repeating ribbed cable pattern. The pattern comes in 2 sizes; small and large. The larger size is shown in the book and it’s a perfect length for wrapping around your neck twice. My absolutely favourite cowl length! It’s got all of the advantages of a scarf but none of the problems of it flying away. (I’ve actually also given directions in the book on how to adapt this pattern to work it as a scarf also).

Last September I was teaching a group of knitters in Ballymaloe and this cowl was actually initially designed for that class. For the class sample I knit a short (neck size) version in Cushendale DK.IMG_5583 IMG_5602

You can see here what the cowl looks like before it’s been grafted; you’ve got the live stitches still on one end and the provisional cast-on at the other. If you’ve never grafted in ribbing before you’ll be delighted to hear that I give step-by-step details in the book! IMG_0995

Interweave Fall 2015

Did any one notice that the new Interweave Knits (Fall 2015) came out this week?

Interweave Knits Fall 2015 Digital Edition (affiliate link)

I’ve got 2 sweaters in this issue:

First is Dee Sweater

This is knit using one of my favourite yarns, Blue Moon Fibers Targhee (also used for my Landscape Waves last year). This sweater is knit from the top down, starting with the waffle stitch saddle shoulders. From there the front and back were knit from each side and joined in the round for the body. The body is knit in one piece to the hem where it is split for front and back and worked in waffle stitch. If you wanted a longer sweater it would be fairly easy to work more length here.
Afterwards the sleeves are knit using short rows to shape the sleeve caps from the top down. The waffle stitch panel continues right from top where the saddle stitches are still live.

My second sweater is the Paddock Cardigan

This cardigan uses Green Mountain Spinnery Mountain Mohair, I used this for the first time in my Short Row Knits book (you’ll see that sweater soon!) This yarn has nice body to it and is delightfully soft and enjoyable to work with.

This sweater is knit in one piece from the bottom up and uses raglan shoulder shaping. The cables used are a zig-zag infinite cable that runs around the hem and has a central cable at the top of the back.

There are some beautiful knits in this issue…Romi’s shawl (Squall Line) is a special favourite of mine!

 

Capitoline

Welcome to the next in my Dovestone Hills patterns; Capitoline (view on ravelry here). Remember that today is the last day that you can use the coupon code DOVESTONE (either free euro shipping or 20% ravelry sale).

This sweater is knit completely from side to side. You begin at one side of the front, casting on all of the stitches for the complete yoke and body. From there you work from side-to-side, working short rows at the yoke so that the yoke is the correct size.

When you reach the sleeves you cast on the sleeves stitches provisionally, work the bottom of the sleeve then the sleeve and yoke are worked together. When the sleeve is finished you graft the start and end of the sleeve together for an invisible seam. For anyone who hates grafting a standard seam will work just fine as well!

When the sleeve is finished we go back and work the side of the body under the sleeve. this is worked using a simple lace stitch with short rows to create an a-line shape at the side of the body.

Now we make our way around the back of the body, again with short row yoke shaping. We work the second sleeve the same way as the first and finally we finish at the other side of the front. And magic, you’ve got a cardigan :-)

Caelius

The Caelius sweater from Dovestone Hills, travelled a lot with me; it started on the plane ride to Denver…then it made it to TNNA in Phoenix (being knit on the show floor) and finally it came home to Ireland.

I wanted this sweater to be a nice fast knit that was super wearable. It’s got a few key features that I love in an everyday sweater; a warm, easy to wear neckline, a long body with enough room that I can wear layers underneath but enough shape that it was flattering to wear.

The sweater begins with the neckline, you can knit it for as long or short as you like. It’s allowed to fold down into a cowl shape.

The yoke is shaped using raglan shoulder shaping that is worked on either side of double yarnover seam lines. These yarnovers continue into the body where the a-line shaping happens between them.

All the edges are designed to be allowed to casually roll so it ‘s easy to modify for your own length, adding or removing length for the sleeves and body.

I’m actually knitting a version for myself in green (Chevin) and grey (Coal) and I think I might add a little length for a super long body….if I ever get knitting time for me again!