Category Archives: Books

Work & puppy love

Anyone who has been following my instagram feed is probably fairly aware by now that I’ve got a new puppy. Because when your youngest is 9 and definitely no longer a baby you need a little crazy in the house :-)
She’s only been with us a few weeks but the joy Lizzie has brought to our house is immeasurable. Every child lights up when they see her and if she comes to collect them from school it might as well be Santa! Even the old man in the house is enjoying his new companion.
kenny& puppy

I’ve now got a constant companion; she sits at my feet when I cook or knit….
sits under my elbow when I’m on the couch in the evening or licks my ear….

She’s even been helping out with homework…

As you can probably guess I’m pretty smitten, a big thank you to DAWG who does such an amazing job fostering dogs and puppies and making sure the world knows how special they all are. And also to West Cork Animals where our first dog came from. Please if you are looking for a new dog go to your local dog rescue, there are so many wonderful little animals that need your love and care.


Short Row Knits Blog Tour

Well everyone the time has come, Short Row Knits has been officially released!
short row knits

I’ve been working on this book for nearly 2 years so it’s just wonderful to see it well received. In fact, the book is being printed 24 hours after it was launched :-)
If you’d like to see more about the individual projects you can check the patterns out on ravelry. There’s also lots of discussion about the book on my ravelry forum, with some requests for a Short Row Knits KAL!

If you want to learn more about the book and the patterns in the book then please following along on our blog tour that will begin tomorrow. Each stop on the tour will have a different aspect of the book covered with lots of giveaways and prizes along the way!

Blog Tour Details


So we come to the final project from Dovestone Hills; Viminal. This sweater uses one of my all time favourite construction techniques; top down with short row set-in sleeves. In this sweater I wanted to blend two very different but complementary colours as seamlessly as possible to create an ombre effect.

The sweater begins at the shoulders with 2 stripes (one for each shoulder) worked from the neck out to the shoulder. These stitches can be left on a holder to form the top of the sleeve later. The stitches for the back and front are picked up from these strips and the shoulder slope is then worked using short rows at each side. The rest of the armholes are worked on each side increasing as necessary. Finally the body is joined under the armholes and worked in the round to the hem. There are a few little finishing details as well; the hem and cuffs are finished with folded hems but they pick up the second colour giving you a little glimpse at the bottom edge. The neck edge is gently rounded (easy to drop down if you want to) and finished with an I-cord edging.

Once the body is finished we go back to work the sleeves. There are live stitches at the top of the sleeve and we pick up stitches along the edge on either side. Short rows are worked back and forth to form the sleeve cap and then the sleeve is worked in the round to the cuff.

What colour combinations do you think you’d do for your version of Viminal?


Palatino, the next pattern from Dovestone Hills was a wonderful surprise to me. It was designed as a hat to match the Esquilino cowl. It is knit from side-to-side with the same ribbed cable pattern as the cowl. However as this is a hat I used short rows at the crown to shape it. As with the cowl you begin with a provisional cast-on. The the hat is knit in a series of wedges that use German Short rows to shape the top (these are very easy to work in both knit and purl) until the correct length and it is grafted together at the end.

The surprise came for me at the end; I had finished the wedges and the grafting was done. I was drawing a needle through the edge stitches in the center of the crown when I saw it; the short rows in the cables created a wonderful star flower at the centre of the crown. It’s my favourite part of the hat and it was a complete surprise :-)

If you need help with German short rows or just want to learn more about Short Rows both my craftsy short row class or my upcoming Short Row book would both be useful to you.



We’re already on the second last garment from Dovestone Hills; Quirinalis. This uses one of my favourite construction techniques, seamless set-in sleeves. The cardigan is knit from the bottom up in one piece to the armhole. From there the front and back are worked separately and armhole decreases are worked. Finally the shoulders are joined together using a 3-needle bind-off. When the body is finished the stitches for the sleeve are picked up around the armhole and the set-in sleeve cap in worked using short rows. The remainder of the sleeve is worked from the top down.

First let’s take a look at the the cables; these are not your standard cables! I wanted this cardigan to have a modern, more geometric feel so the cables I’ve used are zigzag and undulating along the front of the cardigan. I love working cables but when a garment is heavily cabled it can make it a bit dense for everyday wear. These add ‘just enough’ so this can become your favourite everyday cardigan.

You can see here as well that I’ve kept the rest simple; both the back and sleeves are worked in Dot Stitch giving it a nicely textured feel which works really well with a nice woolly yarn.

The folded collar is one of my favourite details; it’s worked to double length and folded inwards, then when you’re doing your bind-off you pick up the cast-on stitches and knit them together. this creates a seamless ‘seam’ that has all the stretch of a knitted finish.


The time has come to take a look at the next accessory from Dovestone Hills; Esquilino. This is a cowl that is knit from side-to-side and uses a repeating ribbed cable pattern. The pattern comes in 2 sizes; small and large. The larger size is shown in the book and it’s a perfect length for wrapping around your neck twice. My absolutely favourite cowl length! It’s got all of the advantages of a scarf but none of the problems of it flying away. (I’ve actually also given directions in the book on how to adapt this pattern to work it as a scarf also).

Last September I was teaching a group of knitters in Ballymaloe and this cowl was actually initially designed for that class. For the class sample I knit a short (neck size) version in Cushendale DK.IMG_5583 IMG_5602

You can see here what the cowl looks like before it’s been grafted; you’ve got the live stitches still on one end and the provisional cast-on at the other. If you’ve never grafted in ribbing before you’ll be delighted to hear that I give step-by-step details in the book! IMG_0995


The Caelius sweater from Dovestone Hills, travelled a lot with me; it started on the plane ride to Denver…then it made it to TNNA in Phoenix (being knit on the show floor) and finally it came home to Ireland.

I wanted this sweater to be a nice fast knit that was super wearable. It’s got a few key features that I love in an everyday sweater; a warm, easy to wear neckline, a long body with enough room that I can wear layers underneath but enough shape that it was flattering to wear.

The sweater begins with the neckline, you can knit it for as long or short as you like. It’s allowed to fold down into a cowl shape.

The yoke is shaped using raglan shoulder shaping that is worked on either side of double yarnover seam lines. These yarnovers continue into the body where the a-line shaping happens between them.

All the edges are designed to be allowed to casually roll so it ‘s easy to modify for your own length, adding or removing length for the sleeves and body.

I’m actually knitting a version for myself in green (Chevin) and grey (Coal) and I think I might add a little length for a super long body….if I ever get knitting time for me again!



Let’s take a look at the first pattern from Dovestone Hills, Aventine. This pattern idea started as a gift. Blue Moon Fibers sent me yarn a couple of years ago, a worsted weight ‘Worthy’ . This yarn in the heavier weight wasn’t made as a commercial yarn so I couldn’t use it for a published pattern. It was so wonderfully soft though that I thought it’d be beautiful to make a gift for my mother who adores green.

I began playing with ideas; I never like doing things the ordinary way (top down simple shawl!) so I began this from the bottom. I started with a standard shawl tab, with standard triangular shawl increases at the center and sides. But then when each diagonal of the shawl was as long as I wanted I separated them. From there I began knitting each shawl side separately; first straight and then angled to decrease. I also added a few buttonholes at the very end to allow the shawl to be wrapped around the front and buttoned at the back. (A common complaint of mine with shawls – it’s hard to hold them in place!).

Just because this shawl is buttoned though doesn’t stop you from using it as a standard wrap or scarf, its happy to do whatever you ask :-)

Baa Ram Ewe knit the second version in Dovestone that was a perfect match for my wrap!

TNNA recap

So a couple of weeks ago I went to Columbus, Ohio once again for TNNA (The national needlearts association). It’s an intense, full-on experience every year and this was no exception! I was sharing a room with two of my favourite knitting pals, Woolly Wormhead & Ann Kingstone, always fun when you can work and play on the same weekend :-)

I’ve got very few photos from the weekend so please forgive the very poor quality, grainy and fuzzy phone photos I’ve got to use.To add to the oddness of the weekend there was also a trumpet convention and a haunting/zombie convention. In fact I had the pleasure of being walked to the Crown Plaza on Saturday by a well dressed zombie before their zombie ball :-)IMG_0524

Also on Friday night I had my new cardigan, Rakuda, in the fashion show with Anzula yarns.You can see the cardigan in action here. (Yes I’ve eventually started using Instagram!)

My new US distributor is Fyberspates, so this year I shared a stand with them and Rachel Coopey.

They were just the most wonderful booth mates, it makes such a difference; it was definitely a weekend of fun more than work!

IMG_0522On the final night, when it was all over I did manage to take a few photos as we sat around the table eating:

IMG_0535Here we’ve got Jeni and Sean from Fyberspates, Rachel Coopey and Jennifer Wood (who I just met that night but is such a delight!).

While my photos are not the best Jeni did manage to bring (and use!) a much better camera so her Facebook feed is worth a look.

I do have some wonderful yarn and other goodies that I’ll be knitting with and reviewing in the coming weeks also….

Lorna's Laces 'Cloudgate'

Lorna’s Laces ‘Cloudgate’

IMG_3604Spin Cycle ‘Dyed in the wool’

IMG_3599Anzula Croquet

IMG_1268And finally Fix-a-Stitch that I’ll try out in the next few weeks….hopefully on a ‘minor’ mistake :-0

At the end of this week I’m heading on holiday BUT when I come back I’ll have a little surprise for you that I’ve been working on with Baa Ram Ewe….

Dovestone Knits


A little peek into the future..

I’ll admit that the title sounds like I could give more away than I actually can :-)

I’m sitting here with the final round of edits for my Short Row Knits book…

book dummy

I can’t quite believe that it’s almost done. Plus I’m just bursting to show you all the book. At the start of next month my newest Craftsy class will be out though and you’ll even get to have a sneak peek at a few of the new knits in the class!

One thing I can show you though is a little look at a new spring KAL I’m working on. It’s in a lightweight yarn, and will be a sweater with lace stripes. I’m very excited at how this is working up, won’t be too long before I can share the finished product with you.

lace stripe

One of the downsides to working on so many big projects at once is that there is a lot less to share with you here. Not only is there this new book, I’m also finishing a big collection for a brand new yarn (you’re going to love it!!), many magazine patterns, Irish Yarn Club patterns and a few more little surprises. I’m not quite sure how I managed to take on so much work at once, but hopefully once I get through the next couple of months without collapsing I’ll have some rocking work to show you all :-) So bear with me while I go into a pattern writing coma.