Category Archives: Patterns

Bloomsbury DK

I’ve been hinting over the last few months about some secret projects I was working on. Well now at last the time has come to reveal one of those secrets to you – Bloomsbury DK!

A few months ago Love Knitting asked if I’d like to be involved with a new project with some other designers; the creation of a new yarn line, The Yarn Collective. This venture was completely new to me, I’ve been on the other end of the process, working on finished yarns only before now. This time I was able to be involved from the start, trying out the yarn and picking the colours. The Yarn Collective involves several designers, each getting their own yarn to design the colours for. The first to launch was Melanie Berg last week with the Portland Lace and her lovely SecretKeeper shawl.
It’s my turn this week and I want to introduce you to Bloomsbury DK and the 3 patterns I designed for the yarn. When I started designing the yarns I had a few different things in mind; first I wanted each colour to be one I loved that could stand alone but I also wanted the colours to work together in harmony. To do this I began with a visual inspiration for each set of colours that I worked around.

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Violet, Dango in Fuchsia and Soot

The first set was inspired by the Fuchsia flower. Fuchsias grow wild in west Cork and in fact are often uses as the west Cork symbol. I love the mix of pinks, purples and greys. In the photos you can see a version of the Dango hat in Fuschia that hasn’t been photographed yet. You can see the different colour tones much more easily in the knitted fabric than in the skein.

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Moss, Oz, Indigo and Surf

The next set was based on the deep blues and greens of the sea, especially the deep colours you get when it’s at full swell with huge surfing waves. These are the colours I’m always drawn to; greens and blues.

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Russet, Sand and Copper

The final set is probably knitters (and my!) favourite season, Autumn. Browns, golds and coppers with some subtle dusty beiges. I love how the tones in these three colours just lead into each other.

So that gives you an outline on how I started the colour design process. From there I also wanted to make sure that each individual set related to the others so the neutral tones from each form almost a bridge between them.

Do you have a colour favourite?

Indigo

Indigo

I didn’t expect to love this deep Indigo blue from Dango so much. Knitted up it feels like a gently faded denim jacket, just lovely subtle variations in the navy blue. It’s got so much depth.

Now we can take a look at the patterns I designed for the yarn. There’s no better way to see how  yarn colour behaves then by knitting so I’d suggest giving them a try!


Russler
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First we have Russler, an oversized, side-to-side shawl that is super warm and generously sized. The chevron stitch pattern is great for showing off the interaction between the three different colours – so it’s a bit like wearing Autumn wrapped around your shoulders!


Lignite
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Next we have Lignite.  This is a top-down raglan tunic, with a gentle v-neck. Designed to fit loosely the stripes of grey lace combine with a gentle a-line shape and an asymmetrical short row hem slope. This creates an easy-to-wear top that can be modified for different sizes.


Dango
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Dango is a great uni-sex hat that combines a very subtle spiral cable with a dramatic central focal cable. I can see one of the boys robbing the sample over Christmas!

Yarn for all these patterns is available exclusively through Love Knitting. Keep an eye on the Yarn Collective over the coming days for some more revelations!

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Gift Knits for Men

It’s that time of year where we accomplish major knitting feats as Christmas creeps ever closer. I don’t know about you but knitting for male relatives is always a problem for me, mostly when it comes to inspiration. So to help you all out, here are some of Carol’s beautiful knitting patterns for men that would make excellent gift knits.

Hats

Mason's Hat pattern by Carol Feller in Studio Donegal Soft tweed.

Mason’s Hat from Interweave Knits

Mason’s Hat  is one of Carol’s latest patterns and you can find it in the holiday issue of Interweave Knits. I think it’s hard to find hat patterns for men and this is available in a wide number of sizes up to a 24″ brim. The pattern is also reversible and stretchy which is fantastic in a gift knit. You can pair this up with the scarf for a matching set if you have the time. If you managed to get these off the needles in a jiffy and your looking for other hat patterns, you can also check out Clypea, Stave hat, Tempano and the Coriander hat.

Socks

Claro Sock knitting pattern by Carol Feller in Susquehanna Knitting Company Susquehanna Sock

Claro Socks

Socks are another great gift and these Claro socks are worked from the cuff down and I think they allow the yarn to really shine. You could chose a plain yarn like the ones above or really go to town with a beautiful self striping yarn like the Zaurroball  pair below. I also like patterns that allow you to learn something new along the way and the short row heel and toe construction here really piqued my interest! If your looking for a cabled sock pattern Casadh has beautiful cables that organically twist in and out of each other to hug your feet!

 

Calro in Schoppel-Wolle Zauberball®

Calro in Schoppel-Wolle Zauberball®

Sweaters

Knockmore sweater in Black Water Abbey 2 Ply Worsted

Knockmore sweater in Black Water Abbey 2 Ply Worsted

I know there are some of you out there who could definitely knit a sweater between now and December 25th and then there are knitters like myself that end up gifting wips on the needles and happily continue to knit away during the xmas break. Knockmore is a beautiful bottom up sweater with saddle shoulders where the sleeves are worked separately and joined to the body at the yoke.  The jumper pictured above is loved so much that it is worn almost every cold winter’s day. If you are looking for something with a little more cables then Straboy could be for you while Terry’s pullover lies nicely between the two.

For the little ones

Lianthite knitting pattern by Carol Feller in Berroco Vintage™ Chunky

Lianthite Jr in Berroco Vintage™ Chunky

I won’t forget the younger men this season and  Liathite Jnr is a favourite around here. This zippered hoodie is worked with chunky yarn and just flies off the needles. The sizing runs from 12 months to 10 years old and is kept interesting with those beautiful cable panels on the front.  If your looking for something for the newest little ones among us, then the Iceling set is a perfect quick knit in aran weight yarn.

Carol has put together this Men’s Collection bundle and is generously offering  25% off both the patterns in the bundle and any of her print books found here. Just use the code MENSKNITS and make sure you grab it before the 10th of December.

What’s your favourite men’s gift? Do you have a favourite pattern from Carol that isn’t mentioned above? Let us know in the comments.

 

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New pattern: Bespin

Last year I got some yarn. But it wasn’t just any yarn, it was a really, really huge single skein of Empire yarn from Jill Makes Stuff.

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My winder wasn’t big enough to hold it all so it was broken down into several smaller cakes.

Every autumn Jill releases several batches of this yarn. Each year I look at it longingly and resist. But last year I eventually went ahead and got myself one of the mighty skeins! The yarn has got a nice high twist and feels very firm when you knit it. As the yarn has such a dense feel to it I wanted to use a more open stitch pattern to lighten it up a little. After some experimenting this is what I settled on, a broken rib pattern with yarnover rows that was dense enough to be warm but still open enough to make the sweater a little lighter.

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If you’re thinking about yarn substitution, Kerry Woollen Mills Aran yarn has a similar weight although Empire is a softer yarn.

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Bespin is knit from the bottom up; it starts with both the front and back hem knit separately (you can see that the back hem is a little longer). These increases in the pattern are shown in both charted and written format so it makes the start easier. Once the hem is finished it’s joined in the round and worked straight to the armhole opening. In the sample shown I’ve got just over 1″ / 2.5 cm of positive ease however I think this is a sweater that would work really well with a generous amount of positive ease, going for 3-4″ / 7.5-10 cm bigger than you bust size should make a great oversized winter sweater.

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Once the body is finished the sleeves are knit in the round also. As they are in stockinette stitch they just fly off the needles!

Finally the body and sleeves are joined in the round. This is a tricky maneuver for the first few rounds as you’re squeezing small sleeves into a bigger yoke circumference. I usually use a much bigger circular needle than necessary and pull a ‘loop’ similar to magic loop out at the middle of the sleeve. I find that this gives enough extra movement to really ease the difficulty of joining the sleeves to the body.

The yoke of this sweater uses raglan shoulder shaping; you can see that the pattern stitch is ‘eaten away’ as you begin working the decreases. By now you will know the pattern stitch very well so it’s easy to see how to maintain the pattern, and for any extra stitches you’ve got you can just work them as knit or purl. The raglan shaping goes through a few different sections (with different decrease rates) so that the yoke is deep enough and each part of the neck fits just right. Each of these sections is detailed with a full stitch count chart for the entire yoke given so you can easily track your work and stitch counts.

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Finally the neck is bound off at the front with decreases worked to shape it. For a deeper neck it’s possible to start the decreases sooner. I opted to use bound-off stitches and decreases at the front rather than short rows as I found it easier to maintain the pattern stitch. If you want to experiment though you could try doing it with short rows also!

I hope you have fun knitting Bespin; do you have any Empire (or another heavy aran) yarn waiting for the perfect project?

The one about Craftsy

With the release of the Ridgeback Craftsy Kit, I thought I could take you on a journey on all things Craftsy. Have you used it? If not or if your looking to find out what’s on offer, this post is for you.

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Kits
Like the Ridgeback set above, I think the one thing that Craftsy is most well known for is craft kits. It’s perfect if you want to recreate the pattern exactly. The yarn is always tailored to the pattern and you always get enough to finish your project.  All you have to do is pick your favourite colour. Carol has three other craft kits available Penrose Tile (shawl), Traveller’s End (cardigan) and the Mendel Sweater.  All of which are on sale at the moment so it’s the perfect time to pick one up for a gift or try your hand at something new.

Penrose Tile Hand knit shawl design by Carol Feller

Penrose Tile Shawl

Patterns

Craftsy also has some special patterns for example this Ross Cowl from Carol is available for free. It’s a perfect introduction to colourwork if you want to try your hand at it. So if you don’t want to buy a kit you can just grab a pattern. Although some patterns are just available initially as a kit.

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Classes

Craftsy is also a great place for online classes and tutorials. These are always fantastic value because they are a one on one session with your favourite designer, that you get to keep forever. Carol has four classes available Essential Short Row Techniques, Celtic Cables and Sweater Surgery. These are perfect to add to your knitter’s tool belt that you can reference whenever you need them. I find a lot of knitters don’t have the time for full classes or can’t get to the venue. These are the answer, plus you can re-watch a technique as many times as you need to. The handy 30 second repeat feature and bookmark/note tool makes it even more useful, you can always find the spot you’re looking for. Carol even has a free Craftsy class if you want to dip your toe in the water. It gives you an idea of how the longer classes are put together and also you get to see Carol’s teaching techniques. You can see what Ssmith94015 thought here:

Great class, learned some new techniques for short rows and how to use them. Helped explain some instructions that I came across in a few patterns and now I know what they were trying to say. Have inspired me to create projects using the short row approach.

But wait there’s more

Craftsy isn’t just for knitters, which is why I love it. I really think that crafters express their creativity over a few mediums and there is everything from cooking, sewing, crochet, art and even gardening.  It’s just one of these places that I go to for a specific reason and I’ve lost half an hour to beautiful quilt supplies.

I hope I have inspired you to check it out, pick up a craft kit or try a class on something new. If there a class you are thinking of taking then let us know in the comments.
Also I am collecting some questions for Carol, so if there is something that you have been itching to ask a knitwear designer or just something you have always wondered then drop it in the comments or over on the Stolen Stitches group on Ravlery.

Thanks for Reading,

Nadia

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Behind the Scenes with the Yarn Club

For the last 3 years I’ve been running the Irish Yarn Club with This Is Knit. I had always wanted to do a club and one that featured Irish hand dyers seemed perfect! A lot of my design work tends to be garments so a club with very focused, smaller pieces seemed like a fun project to work on.
When we are putting the clubs together I try to keep a mix at every level; with yarn type, colours dyed and project types. This keeps it interesting for me designing and makes it more likely for knitters to have a project they can fall in love with.
In last year’s club we decided on 3 different yarn weights; lace weight (Hedgehog Fibres ‘Merino Lace‘), fingering weight (Townhouse Yarns ‘Spire Singles‘) and worsted (Donegal Wool Spinning Company dyed by Dublin Dye Company).

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Each of these yarn had very different properties that would create very different dye effects. To start with Yvonne from Dublin Dye Company did some experimenting with the Donegal yarn. Hand dyers primarily use superwash yarn, which behaves very well with hand dyeing. When a colour is applied it stays pretty much where it is put which allows them to create semi-solid colours and even speckles. However the Donegal yarn was a woollen spun (very hairy!) yarn and obviously not superwash. This means that when dye is applied it immediately gets sucked up into the fibre and spreads quickly. Due to this a semi-solid to solid colour was the best option. The colour that Yvonne created was a wonderful rich green. The base yarn starts off as a darker colour, closer to a beige brown, and when it was dyed even a small amount created a rich, deep colour. In fact the amount of dye needed was closer to what she would generally use to create a pastel shade on a white yarn base!
As this yarn was a worsted weight with less than 200m I wanted a smaller project. I ended up settling on a cabled hat (Sheephaven) with a folded brim that used the complete skein and created a cosy hat that really showed off the colour. I did get caught with yarn amount though – the medium size used the single skein exactly but several knitters were running a little short. Even a slight difference in either the yardage of the skein or in knitting tension is enough to push it over the edge of a single skein.


The next yarn was the lace yarn with Hedgehog Fibres. Working with Beata I knew that she was creating some fantastic speckled yarn at the moment so that seemed like a great dyeing technique to have in the club. I used pinterest to throw out a few colour ideas to her and let her do her magic :-)
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When designing with the laceweight yarn there was a huge amount of yardage, 1200 m! This really opens up the possibilities for different project types. I started experimenting with stitch patterns that enhanced speckled yarn and eventually settled on a drop stitch pattern that showed off the colours and also broke it up a bit.

1 Not everyone likes doing garment type projects so Kompeito had both the option of a sleeveless vest or just a side-to-side shawl.


The final yarn for last years club was a fingering weight gradient yarn dyed by Townhouse Yarns. I was particularly excited about this yarn as I was also starting on my Knitting With Rainbows book! I put a pinterst board together with some colour ideas.
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As you can see we were talking about a big range of colours in the gradient. Because of this I decided to use a slip stitch pattern in the project. Slip stitches are a great way of combining different colours together and work best when there is an obvious difference between each colour. This project comes with 5 little skeins (20g each) of each colour. Before you start knitting you divide each of them in 2 again so you have enough yarn for each of your arm warmers. Proby’s Armwarmers were knit nice and long to take full advantage of the range of colours, I wanted to make sure that as much yarn as possible was used! This project actually ended up in Knitting With Rainbows as it fit right in :-)
So there you have a brief overview of the yarn colour and design process. It’s all about variety and creating the best match of yarn, colour and project.

What kind of projects and yarn will you be hoping for in the 2017 club?

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Cosy up with Cables

When winter starts to draw in around here, we start to look to heavier weight yarns and cables. On Tuesday, Carol posted some cable tutorials along with a blog post on working with cables. I thought it might be nice to talk about three patterns that show off cables quite differently.

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Cables in Accessories
It’s hard sometimes to comprehend knitting a garment with a new technique in it. In times like these I find myself picking up accessory patterns as they are often small, quick, knits that can lead to instant gratification and a feeling of triumph. For the Wrap up Winter KAL, I will be knitting the Stannum gauntlets. These have a dramatic, mirrored cable that runs along the top of the mitt and then on the palms they have beautiful diagonal cables that are more simple and mirrored. If you want to tackle these along with me, you can hop over to the KAL board and there is also an discount offer on the Wrap Up Winter bundle until November 10th.
Hand knit mitts Stannum by Carol Feller in Townhouse yarns grafton 4 ply

Stannum in Townhouse Yarns Grafton 4 ply.

For something that lies between garments and mitts you can try Mason’s Scarf. This pattern from the latest issue of Interweave Knits has beautiful reversible cables that weave in and out of a rib pattern. Men’s accessory patterns are hard to find and I just love the timeless look of this pattern. (Plus reversible is always a bonus in a scarf!)

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Mason’s Scarf from Interweave Knits Holiday Issue

Cables in Garments
 
If you want to jump all in, one of my favourite garment patterns is Ardara from Contemporary Irish Knits. These cables are showcased on a background of reverse stocking stitch and worked vertically to draw the eye down the length of the garment. I just want to cuddle up in this until spring appears. If your new to the blog, you can read all about Carol’s Contemporary Irish Knits launch in the archives here.
ardara knitting pattern by carol feller in studio donegal aran tweed

Ardara from Contemporary Irish Knits in Studio Donegal Aran Tweed

Now that I’ve put the idea of winter and cables in your head, you may want to try a cable garment this is tailored to your fit?  To get some support and back up while you work, you can take a look at Carol’s Craftsy class on Celtic Cables where you can make the below Portulaca cardigan. There is a discount code for 50% off until October 31st when you use this link here.
Portulaca from Celtic Cables Craftsy Class by carol feller in studio donegal soft

Portulaca from Celtic Cables Craftsy Class

I’ve held you up for long enough now, do you have a favourite Carol cable pattern? Are you going to be joining in the KAL? Then leave a comment on the blog and let us know what you will be doing, we would love to hear from you.

As always you can find Carol on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and you can follow the blog using the subscribe button or Bloglovin’.

Until next week, wrap yourself in cables,
Nadia

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Choosing Your Yarn

Yarn substitution can be a very tricky thing. On the surface it seems like just picking a yarn with the same gauge should do the job but that is just the starting point!

I’ve had a few requests for substitutions for the Luwan KAL so I thought I’d do a little swatching and put my thoughts and some general information together for knitters.

Yarn varies is several different ways but the three most significant are; weight, construction and fiber blend. If you want to substitute a yarn within a pattern ideally all 3 of these items should be as close as possible to the original yarn used for the sample. Now if that’s not possible you can pick the items that are most important to you and swatch in the stitch pattern used.

This swatch will tell you a few different things:

  • Do you get close to the original gauge?
  • How does the fabric feel and move?
  • Does the yarn do the stitch pattern justice/does it look good?

Lets break down these yarn characteristics and discuss each one separately.

YARN WEIGHT

It seems like this should be an easy one – pick a yarn that is either named the same or has the same weight, right?

However yarn names are very, very confusing! For Luwan we used a yarn that is technically a ‘dk’ weight yarn but if you look at dk (double knit) yarns they can range from 20 to 24 stitches per 4″ / 10 cm. Due to this I’d suggest watching the gauge rather than the name of the yarn, this will be the best indicator.

With this yarn you can see that using 4.5mm (US size 7) needles I get a gauge of 18 stitches per 4″ / 10 cm in pattern. This is obviously a bigger gauge than dk yarn but yet the stitches don’t appear to be loose? There are a couple of reasons for this; firstly the pattern stitch naturally creates a bigger gauge than stockinette stitch. But also this ‘dk’ yarn is both a heavy dk and a single ply yarn. When you hold the yarn it ‘fluffs out’ and takes up much more space than it seems like it should! This means that it looks great knit more loosely than it’s name would indicate. I’ll talk a bit more about the construction in the next section. So when looking at yarn weight look for either a heavy DK weight yarn or a light worsted yarn for best results.

YARN CONSTRUCTION

There are several different ways to make yarn. I’m definitely not a spinning expert but I’ve got enough working knowledge to get started and know how a yarn will behave.

The 2 main ways yarn is spun is either Woollen spun or Worsted spun.

With Woollen spun when the fibre is carded it’s allowed to remain scattered in different directions. This creates a yarn that will have loose hairs poking out but it makes a much lighter fluffier yarn. When you knit with Woollen spun yarn after blocking the yarn ‘blooms’, which means that it really fills in and softens the stitches.

Worsted spun has all the fibres lined up in the same direction. This creates a smoother but heavier yarn. You will have better stitch definition but you won’t get the ‘blooming’ effect after the yarn is blocked.

The yarn used in the Luwan KAL (Silky Single Targhee) is spun in a different way again. Both Woollen and Worsted spinning refer to yarns that are plied. This means that several strands of fibre are twisted together to form a strong stable yarn. This yarn however is a single yarn. This means that there is only a single strand of yarn twisting on itself. To give it a bit of stability and strength it is lightly felted which gives it a little firmness and durability. Often single yarns can be unbalanced, wanting to curl up on itself as you work. Fortunately the felting seems to help with this and this yarn didn’t have that issue. Due to the yarn being a single yarn it blooms very nicely when washed to create a nice full fabric.

YARN FIBRE

Silky Single Targhee is made from 70% Targhee wool and 30% silk. Wool is the dominant fibre in the yarn and you can feel that when you are working with it. Silk adds softness and a bit more weight as it is a heavy fibre.

For substituting you could comfortable use a yarn that is 100% wool. I think it would behave well enough to hold the stitch pattern. Silk does add a little bit extra though!

Lets take a look at a few swatches now to figure out how all the factors influence our final swatches.

The swatch below shows from top to bottom SHELTER, Dovestone DK, and the KAL yarn Silky Single Targhee. Both of the substituted swatches I did here are woollen spun which means that they have a hairier look. This creates a totally different looking stitch pattern! The Shelter ended up being too heavy and gave me much too big a gauge. The Dovestone DK however was spot on for both stitch and row gauge. It does look really different though! I suspect that woollen spun is a little too hairy to allow the stitch pattern to show through enough.

Below is another Blue Moon Fiber Arts yarn – Targhee Worsted in colour Gourdy. This is a plied yarn so the texture is a little different but I got both stitch and row gauge with it for Luwan so it could be a potential substitute if you didn’t want to use a singles yarn.

So now it’s in your court! What yarn will you use? Come chat with other knitters on the ravelry board here, it can be very helpful to get advice from other knitters!

I’ve just discovered Bloginlovin – seems like a great way to to keep up with multiple blogs!
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Iced Iced Baby

Hello everyone, I’m Nadia and you will see a little bit of me here on Carol’s blog in the future. Some of you may know me from putting very nice yarn in your hands in This Is Knit or from gushing about gardening and crafts on Ravelry as Bunnyt. I’m more than a little excited to be here and this week I have an autumnal inspired post for you.  

I was having a look through the Stolen Stitches patterns on Ravelry and I really wasn’t surprised that Iced has the highest number of projects of Carol’s on Ravelry. This time of year with the cold air seeping in, this is exactly the type of garment that I would choose to knit, just like the 1,749 of you that also reached for it!

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Iced in Garnstudio Drops Ice

So I asked myself, why is this cardigan popular?

Is it the relaxed ease of knitting a garment on chunky needles for a satisfying quick knit? Or the ease of a top down knit with raglan increases? Or the flattering waist shaping that gives a bulky garment a touch of feminine class? I fear, I may never know what all of you were thinking! But it was appealing and approachable enough to become some knitters first or second try at a knitted garment – I bet Carol is so pleased! Just have a look at this Iced by HHorncastle on Ravelry. It was her first raglan and I happen to know she’s over the moon with it and it matches her car too. Double win! 

HHorncastle's Iced

HHorncastle’s Iced

Iced is also a good introduction to short rows and top down knitting.

Never knitted a short row? Well we have you covered!

The tutorial section explains how to do these garter stitch short rows and you can access it whenever you are ready to approach them!

Wait, you say you have tried short rows but you want to take it to the next level? Then the Craftsy class on Essential Short Row Techniques is the place to be. The best thing about these classes is you can take them at your leisure and referencing back to them is easy and you have access forever. If you want to check it out, you can see the free short row class here.

I hear you, it’s a popular pattern but I only knit for the smaller humans among us. The Iced pattern was so popular, there is even a teeny tiny sized Iceling, this time in Aran weight for the smaller bodies. A perfect quick knit for those little arrivals this time of year and topped off with a toasty little hat, I mean just look at these happy faces:

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TheaPurls' Iceling

TheaPurls’ Iceling

Tricoternana's Iceling

Tricoternana’s Iceling

I hope I’ve inspired you to pick up your knitting in the way that Autumn has inspired me to knit all the things! Wondering what’s going on here in the land of Stolen Stitches? The Luwan KAL has just been released for pre-sale and you can check that out over on Ravelry. There is also a dedicated group for the KAL and now is the perfect time to pop in and make some introductions.

The Knitting with Rainbows is just finishing up on October 10th, so those of you with wips on the needles, I foresee a busy weekend ahead! You can check the current FO’s out here. If you just want to hangout and have a chat with us, you can do that over in the Ravelry group or drop a comment on the blog. We really do love chatting to all of you, in fact stop what your doing right now and head on over there and drop in and say hi!

See you next week!

Nadia
Psst – Are you hosting a KAL with one of Carol’s patterns? She would love to see them, so try and tag all your wips, FO’s, Instagram posts with #stolenstitches so we can all see too and you never know what might happen!

 

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Luwan KAL coming soon

It’s almost time for our next KAL! Luwan sweater KAL will be on pre-sale October 5th and the first clue will be released on the 5th of November. This gives lots of time to order yarn, swatch and pick you size.
I really enjoy running sweater KAL’s (knitalongs) as there is always a few knitters working on their first garment. The KAL process is perfect for new garment knitters; you walk slowly through each step of the process and the encouragement of other knitters is very helpful. You also get to see that everyone makes mistakes; new knitters, experienced knitters and me the designer. As you become more experienced these mistakes don’t go away but they do become less. What’s most important is how you deal with them. Rather than tearing your hair out with support you can approach the problem thoughtfully and figure out a solution that you’re happy with. It really is true that you learn more from your mistakes if you acknowledge them and learn!

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So then the question is – what will you learn in this KAL?

Luwan is a top down sweater with set-in short row sleeves. I love this type of construction as it makes it really easy for knitters to modify. To start with you cast-on your shoulder stitches, then you use German Short Rows to shape the shoulders and work down from there.

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This sweater has got a very subtle textured pattern stitch that is fast to knit but really allows the soft single ply yarn to bloom. Blue Moon Fiber Arts Single Silky Targhee is lightly felted which is important for durability in a singles yarn. I’ve used a semi-solid colour but the texture would look great with a bit more colour variation as well.

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Once you’ve finished the upper body the next step is the lower body. In the sample I’ve worked it straight down with no increases or decreases allowing the short row back hem shaping to take centre stage.

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Finally the sweater is finished with top down short row sleeve caps and sleeves worked in the round. I worked 3/4 length sleeves but as they are top down it would be easy to modify them to be longer.

So in this KAL what kind of modifications can you try?
In the pattern tips I’ll give suggestions to adjust the shoulder width for your size, give some tips to add or reduce length and some pointers to make the body a-line. I’ll also have some sleeve modification suggestions to change the size and length. Most importantly you’ll have support and help from other knitter (and me also!) in the ravelry group to give you the best chance of finishing your sweater!

More Manos Pretties!

Well I’ve had a busy week adding new patterns! Until the end of September all of these 3 patterns (whether you purchase on my site or ravelry) have an automatic 15% discount.

Earlier this week I shared the first of my Manos Del Uruguay patterns, Clypea which is a striped hat using a slip stitch pattern between the stripes.
The next day I released a fun shawl, Mylio.


This shawl is knit from the top down and uses extra increases along the edges to create a wide wing effect. The central increases work along each side of the lace panel, stepping out a full repeat every time you’ve completed a lace repeat for an interesting stepped effect. Outside the lace panel this shawl is worked in garter stitch and has a delicate, fun ruffle at the bottom edge.

The final one of this pattern trio is Strombus.



This is a top down cardigan that uses short row set in sleeves and has a double-breasted front panel that buttons across itself. This cardigan is knit more loosely to allow it to flow and swing, the side panels are in garter stitch and widen as you go down the body to create a swinging a-line. I’ve show this cardigan with several inches of positive ease but it will also work well a little more closely fitted if that’s how you like to wear your cardigans!