Category Archives: Yarn

The Road Not Taken

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

When I was in school I learned this poem and out of all the poems, novels and plays I studied this one has stuck with me. There are so many times in life where you are presented with options and want to do both. You stand at a crossroads and must choose. This also happens with design work; every step along the way is a decision. Each choice is not necessarily good or bad – just different.
When I spent a year in art college we ended the year with a project. We picked a topic and then spend the next several months examining it from different angles. There were charcoal drawings, pastel drawings, long lost sculptures and paper texture work. I’ve recently rediscover a lot of this in my parents attic and it’s made me a little nostalgic! (And yes, my project was on a prawn…it smelled really, really dreadful after several months even with freezes between uses.)




Over the coming months I’m starting a new project. I’m gradually piecing together in my head how I want it to work. It will be an exploration of colour combinations and gradients. I want to do more than a single design, it feels like this is a project that needs to take as many forks on the road as possible. There will be swatches, tutorials, patterns and project options. I think an e-book released over a series of weeks or months a chapter at a time that travels on the exploration journey with me would be the most useful for knitters.

Anyone want to join me on this journey?

New pattern – Shaniko!

I’d like to thank all of you for your naming help, I’ve been inundated with names here on my blog, on ravelry, facebook and instagram!
I’ve decided on the name – Shaniko. I both like the sound of the name and the history behind it which seems very fitting!
Congrats to Andrea for picking the winner.
However I want everyone to win on this one so until the 8th of November code ‘IMPERIAL’ will get 20% off the pattern price for everyone :-) You just need to ‘add to cart’ and then you’ll have the option on checkout to use a coupon code.


This is actually one of the longest patterns I’ve ever written, I wanted to demystify more complex patterns so full stitch counts outside each of the charts are given on the raglan and at the waist shaping. Each of the 5 charts is also written out for anyone who dislikes charts and I’ve given details of German Short Rows for working the collar. For short rows in Moss Stitch its definitely the nicest way of working short rows!

Hope you enjoy; this is a great cardigan to keep your mind busy on cables and is super warm when you’re finished.

Irish Yarn Club 2016 is go!

Irish Yarn club 2016

This is the third year that I’m running the Irish Yarn Club with This Is Knit and I’ve never been this excited about it! The Irish Yarn Club this year has got a few really, really exciting developments. Up to this point all yarn has been hand dyed in Ireland but the yarn was all milled elsewhere. For the first time we’re going to have a yarn milled in Donegal by Donegal Yarns and hand dyed by Dublin Dye Company. I’ve had a peek at the yarn and it’s just glorious :-)

But that’s just for starters….Hedgehog Fibres has been producing some out-of-this world colours over the last year. When I went to visit her studio last month I was just blown away with what they’re doing. I think you’ll like her yarn club offering this year!

I want to keep the final yarn from Townhouse Yarns a surprise…it’s a type of yarn dyeing that I’ve fallen totally in love with over the last year and will be so much fun to knit with. I’m not going to give any more away though!

As you can problem tell I’m extraordinarily excited about the club yarns this year, watching them transform into finished knits is going to be even more exciting. Please join me on the adventure.

So are you in? Don’t miss the chance to grab a spot in the club:

Full club membership (yarn & patterns) here.
Pattern only membership here.


So we come to the final project from Dovestone Hills; Viminal. This sweater uses one of my all time favourite construction techniques; top down with short row set-in sleeves. In this sweater I wanted to blend two very different but complementary colours as seamlessly as possible to create an ombre effect.

The sweater begins at the shoulders with 2 stripes (one for each shoulder) worked from the neck out to the shoulder. These stitches can be left on a holder to form the top of the sleeve later. The stitches for the back and front are picked up from these strips and the shoulder slope is then worked using short rows at each side. The rest of the armholes are worked on each side increasing as necessary. Finally the body is joined under the armholes and worked in the round to the hem. There are a few little finishing details as well; the hem and cuffs are finished with folded hems but they pick up the second colour giving you a little glimpse at the bottom edge. The neck edge is gently rounded (easy to drop down if you want to) and finished with an I-cord edging.

Once the body is finished we go back to work the sleeves. There are live stitches at the top of the sleeve and we pick up stitches along the edge on either side. Short rows are worked back and forth to form the sleeve cap and then the sleeve is worked in the round to the cuff.

What colour combinations do you think you’d do for your version of Viminal?


We’re already on the second last garment from Dovestone Hills; Quirinalis. This uses one of my favourite construction techniques, seamless set-in sleeves. The cardigan is knit from the bottom up in one piece to the armhole. From there the front and back are worked separately and armhole decreases are worked. Finally the shoulders are joined together using a 3-needle bind-off. When the body is finished the stitches for the sleeve are picked up around the armhole and the set-in sleeve cap in worked using short rows. The remainder of the sleeve is worked from the top down.

First let’s take a look at the the cables; these are not your standard cables! I wanted this cardigan to have a modern, more geometric feel so the cables I’ve used are zigzag and undulating along the front of the cardigan. I love working cables but when a garment is heavily cabled it can make it a bit dense for everyday wear. These add ‘just enough’ so this can become your favourite everyday cardigan.

You can see here as well that I’ve kept the rest simple; both the back and sleeves are worked in Dot Stitch giving it a nicely textured feel which works really well with a nice woolly yarn.

The folded collar is one of my favourite details; it’s worked to double length and folded inwards, then when you’re doing your bind-off you pick up the cast-on stitches and knit them together. this creates a seamless ‘seam’ that has all the stretch of a knitted finish.


The time has come to take a look at the next accessory from Dovestone Hills; Esquilino. This is a cowl that is knit from side-to-side and uses a repeating ribbed cable pattern. The pattern comes in 2 sizes; small and large. The larger size is shown in the book and it’s a perfect length for wrapping around your neck twice. My absolutely favourite cowl length! It’s got all of the advantages of a scarf but none of the problems of it flying away. (I’ve actually also given directions in the book on how to adapt this pattern to work it as a scarf also).

Last September I was teaching a group of knitters in Ballymaloe and this cowl was actually initially designed for that class. For the class sample I knit a short (neck size) version in Cushendale DK.IMG_5583 IMG_5602

You can see here what the cowl looks like before it’s been grafted; you’ve got the live stitches still on one end and the provisional cast-on at the other. If you’ve never grafted in ribbing before you’ll be delighted to hear that I give step-by-step details in the book! IMG_0995


Welcome to the next in my Dovestone Hills patterns; Capitoline (view on ravelry here). Remember that today is the last day that you can use the coupon code DOVESTONE (either free euro shipping or 20% ravelry sale).

This sweater is knit completely from side to side. You begin at one side of the front, casting on all of the stitches for the complete yoke and body. From there you work from side-to-side, working short rows at the yoke so that the yoke is the correct size.

When you reach the sleeves you cast on the sleeves stitches provisionally, work the bottom of the sleeve then the sleeve and yoke are worked together. When the sleeve is finished you graft the start and end of the sleeve together for an invisible seam. For anyone who hates grafting a standard seam will work just fine as well!

When the sleeve is finished we go back and work the side of the body under the sleeve. this is worked using a simple lace stitch with short rows to create an a-line shape at the side of the body.

Now we make our way around the back of the body, again with short row yoke shaping. We work the second sleeve the same way as the first and finally we finish at the other side of the front. And magic, you’ve got a cardigan :-)


The Caelius sweater from Dovestone Hills, travelled a lot with me; it started on the plane ride to Denver…then it made it to TNNA in Phoenix (being knit on the show floor) and finally it came home to Ireland.

I wanted this sweater to be a nice fast knit that was super wearable. It’s got a few key features that I love in an everyday sweater; a warm, easy to wear neckline, a long body with enough room that I can wear layers underneath but enough shape that it was flattering to wear.

The sweater begins with the neckline, you can knit it for as long or short as you like. It’s allowed to fold down into a cowl shape.

The yoke is shaped using raglan shoulder shaping that is worked on either side of double yarnover seam lines. These yarnovers continue into the body where the a-line shaping happens between them.

All the edges are designed to be allowed to casually roll so it ‘s easy to modify for your own length, adding or removing length for the sleeves and body.

I’m actually knitting a version for myself in green (Chevin) and grey (Coal) and I think I might add a little length for a super long body….if I ever get knitting time for me again!



Let’s take a look at the first pattern from Dovestone Hills, Aventine. This pattern idea started as a gift. Blue Moon Fibers sent me yarn a couple of years ago, a worsted weight ‘Worthy’ . This yarn in the heavier weight wasn’t made as a commercial yarn so I couldn’t use it for a published pattern. It was so wonderfully soft though that I thought it’d be beautiful to make a gift for my mother who adores green.

I began playing with ideas; I never like doing things the ordinary way (top down simple shawl!) so I began this from the bottom. I started with a standard shawl tab, with standard triangular shawl increases at the center and sides. But then when each diagonal of the shawl was as long as I wanted I separated them. From there I began knitting each shawl side separately; first straight and then angled to decrease. I also added a few buttonholes at the very end to allow the shawl to be wrapped around the front and buttoned at the back. (A common complaint of mine with shawls – it’s hard to hold them in place!).

Just because this shawl is buttoned though doesn’t stop you from using it as a standard wrap or scarf, its happy to do whatever you ask :-)

Baa Ram Ewe knit the second version in Dovestone that was a perfect match for my wrap!

Dovestone Hills

The time has come to share my Baa Ram Ewe collaboration with you – last August they told me about a brand new yarn, Dovestone DK, that they were producing and asking if I’d like to do a pattern collection to go with it. Needless to say I jumped at the chance; a great company plus a wonderful new woolly Yorkshire yarn. What’s not to like?
I wasn’t disappointed, I had so much fun with the yarn; it’s bouncy and rustic but not rough. The official yarn launch is in August (come book your place for the launch and my class!) but the yarn can be pre-ordered already.

So I welcome you to Dovestone Hills.

Dovestone Knits

There are 3 different ways to purchase. Plus a few early bird discounts for you special people!

If you want digital only you can purchase in Euro. With code DOVESTONE get 20% off. add to cart
For dollar purchases of the digital/print package get 20% off book cost also with DOVESTONE. add to cart

If you want a signed copy (with a digital code also) you can buy in Euro directly from me here. With code DOVESTONE you’ll have free shipping.

Note: These codes are valid until the end of July only.

I’ve recently joined (well actually started using!) Instagram and it’s a lovely way to start sharing a new project. You can find me here as feller.carol.
Over the coming days I’m going to share each of the projects individually with you but for now here’s a glance at all 7 in one go.