Tag Archives: EYF

New pattern before EYF 2017!

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Last year at Edinburgh Yarn Festival I picked up enough Wollmeise DK yarn for a sweater. As you can see the choice was overwhelming and I spent an awful lot of time trying to decide on colours! It was a colour combination I just loved but it took me until the end of 2016 before I got an opening to knit it! I know I’m not alone in this but I’m delighted that I used it up before the 2017 EYF begins. This was my first time working with this yarn and I loved the deep, saturated colours. As it’s a superwash yarn that has a very high twist it feels tight and dry running through your fingers and doesn’t have a lot of spring. I thought a cardigan that allowed the colours to shine with garter and stockinette would be best as high twist yarns have fantastic stitch definition with simple stitches.

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Welcome to Slateford!
This top down raglan has a few little interesting details. At the top of the shoulder and on each sleeve top there is a little triangle of garter. It’s easy to knit but gives it just a little accent. Also, at the top of the raglan the sleeves aren’t initially increased. This creates a slight saddle shoulder look and makes the front of the neck sit higher.
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As you work down the body I introduced a second colour (I had a single skein of this colour that I couldn’t resist!). I love the effect of gradually increasing one colour while you decrease the second one. It looks good and is flattering to wear a darker colour on the lower half.

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Do you have any stash that you bought in last year’s festival (either EYF or another one) that you want to use before the year is out?

Gradients Part 1: EYF Gradient Sets

Over the last few months I’ve become rather obsessed with gradients. I’ve been putting a collection together and it’s really inspiring me for the EYF class I’ll be teaching in March. When people talk about gradients they can mean several different things; sometimes it means a colour that graduated from light to dark within the same colour family  (also referred to as Ombre) or alternatively  it may be a gradient that graduates from one colour to another. The terms are often used interchangeably.

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Colour graduating from light to dark within the same colour family. (Shades of Turquoise from The Knitting Goddess)

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Colours moving from yellow, through orange and rust into a dark brown. (Autumn Harvest from Fiber Optic Yarns)

There are many different way to create gradients. Here I’ve outlined a few that I’ve come across with photo examples of each. Knitting with gradients is so much fun, you can’t wait to see how the next colour looks knitted up!

1. Mini-skein gradients

This is very much as it sounds, a larger skein is broken down into several mini-skeins (could be any number but 5 seems to be fairly common).

IMG_0034Here is an example of a single colour gradient going from light to dark green (Shaded Olives from The Knitting Goddess). This set has 5 different colours.

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This graduated set moves from a deep pink to a pale pastel pink (Party of 5, Sweet Georgia, Hanami).

IMG_0012This is an example of a mini-skein set that had related colours graduating from dark to light and then to dark again in a different colour (Dragonfly Fibers sock gradient set, Winter Woods).

2. Single skein gradients

This is a single skein of yarn that has been dyed so that it gradually moves from one colour to another. This can be one single colour graduation over the entire skein or it can be shorter colour gradients so that it goes through a few colour changes (this is a pretty close sister to some of the more subtle self-striping yarns).

IMG_0020These yarns are an example of a single skein gradient that moves from one colour to another across a single skein (Knitcircus Greatest of Ease ‘Gnarly Dude’ and Lavish ‘Brass and Steam’).

IMG_0022Here again we have a single skein gradient but it moves from a very pale/white to a deep pink in the single skein (Freia fine handpaints Ombre Grande ‘Valentine’)

IMG_0033This is a single skein of yarn that graduates through a range of colours in a gently graduated set of stripes that repeats (Kauni Wool 8/2 Effektgarn)

3. DIY gradients

There is nothing stopping you from creating your own gradients. If you’ve got an extensive yarn collection gather similar weight yarns together and see if you can create a pleasing gradient with what’s in your stash. Any yarn supplier that has a wide range of colours is perfect for creating gradients. Look for a yarn supplier that would typically supply yarn for complex colourwork and you should easily be able to create your own gradient with their yarn.

IMG_0026Here is a range of Navia Duo colours that are close enough to each other that they can be combined to create a gradient.

EYF Students

If you’re taking the ‘Painting with Rainbows’ class with me at EYF you’ll want to bring a selection of gradient colours with you. You can either come with a pre-purchased pack or alternatively you can make your own. I’ve been digging through the EYF vendors to see who has some gradient yarn in their shops and this is what I’ve come up with, so you can either stock up before the class or grab some in the marketplace afterward to practice your new skills!

Mini-Skein Gradients:

La Bien Aimée
Easy Knits
Fyberspates
The Knitting Goddess
Purlescence
The Little Grey Sheep
Rainbow Heirloom
Ripple Crafts
Snail Yarn
Skein Queen
Eden Cottage Yarns

Single skein gradient:

Bilium
Namolio
The Wool Kitchen

Wide Colour ranges for DIY gradient sets:

New Lanark
The Skye Shilasdair
Jamiesons

Exciting week!

Last week I was one of 4 finalists for the Craftsy Blogger awards and I’m delighted to tell you all that I won runner up :-) Thank you everyone that voted for me, I was very, very pleased – this was a first for me!

Craftsy Blogger Awards - Runner Up Best Instructor's Blog Badge

I had another exciting announcement last week as well – the book I’ve been working on for the last 18 months is now up for pre-sale – Short Row Knits.

short row knits coverThis book was such a pleasure to write. I use short rows for so many of my knits it made complete sense to write a book on the subject! The book starts with the basics, describing different ways of working short rows in stockinette stitch. From there I also look at using short rows with different stitch patterns, in reverse stockinette and in garter stitch. However learning how to work short rows is only the first step, the more interesting part is figuring out where and how to use them! I’ve worked through different ways of varying slopes, how you can use those slopes to shape shawls, socks, balls, hoods, bust shaping, shoulder slopes and hips (to name a few!). Every pattern in the book uses short rows in some way and it details which short row method I’ve suggested.  So if you want to know more about the workings of short rows this is a good book for you (or even if you just want to knit the short row patterns!).

For anyone who likes to learn in-person with some hands on knitting I’ll be teaching a short row class at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival. There are a few spots left and I’ll be working through some of the short row techniques from the book (plus sneak peaks of the book patterns!).

Dragonfly Fibers Giveaway Winner!

Anna C with her Pixie yarn color choice of That Ol’ Chestnut is the winner of the Dragonfly Fibers giveaway, congratulations!